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Juneteenth, A Culinary History Part 4

Juneteenth, A Culinary History Part 4

 Emancipation Day depiction, Courtesy of the New York Public Library

Emancipation Day depiction, Courtesy of the New York Public Library

Been doing a series on Juneteenth.  On June 19, 1865 in Galveston, Texas, General Gordon Granger declared all slaves free 2.5 years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. “Juneteenth” (a mixture of June and nineteen) began thereafter in Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma with parades and festivals. The celebration spread with the migration of African-Americans from these states. During the Depression celebrations declined but the Civil Rights and Black Power movements of the 1960s and 70s revitalized the holiday in African American communities. Black history, educating people about African American contributions, and agitating for the advancement of African American needs (and sometimes for reparations) serves as the reason for the holiday, but down home cooking has attracted large crowds too. In addition to Texas style barbecue there are side dishes, beverages and desserts that are read and color something that is a hallmark of the celebration. 

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Juneteenth

Black Panther Party Through the Lens of Food

Black Panther Party Through the Lens of Food

Juneteenth, A Culinary History Part 3

Juneteenth, A Culinary History Part 3