Welcome to Dr. Frederick Douglass Opie's personal website

AB, 101 Fast Food Head Shot.2jpg.jpg
The Women of Windsor, North Carolina

The Women of Windsor, North Carolina

My grandmother Luesta Duers, Courtesy of Food Prof Productions

My grandmother Luesta Duers, Courtesy of Food Prof Productions

 

My maternal Grandmother, Luesta Duers, was the grand matriarch of my family. Here home in Ossining, New York served at the meeting place for her family. A native of Windsor, North Carolina, the story goes Grandma originally left Windsor to earn a teacher’s certificate at North Carolina Normal School for teachers. She dropped out of school, eloped, and migrated with her husband to Philadelphia. Apparently a sister sent word to her and her other sister Maggie that she had jobs lined up for them in Ossining. Grandma was the upstairs maid and my great aunt Bertha was downstairs, they all did domestic work. For allot of women of the 1940s and 1950s, especially black women, those were the jobs available to them.  In the North, cooks continued the southern tradition of regularly baking corn bread, but for some unknown reason it took on a distinctively sweeter taste. Southerners dismissed the sweeter northern interpretation of corn bread as unfit for consumption. However, over time, the corn bread of newcomers from the South became more northern in style, just like the migrants themselves. 

Corn Bread Recipe

Ingredients

2 cups buttermilk

1 cup of molasses

1 tablespoon baking soda dissolved in 1/3 cup of water

1 teaspoon of salt

2 cups corn meal

2 cups rye meal, or ground graham crackers mixed well together

 

Directions

Grease four baking pans and pour the mixture into them. Grease the covers and place lightly over the bread. Steam two and a half or three hours. After steaming, let the loaves stand a few minutes, when they can be lightly shaken out.”

The Florida Agriculturist April 1892

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter 

 Carolina Foodways and Recipes

Great Migration Stories and Recipes

 Corn Bread Stories and Recipes

 

 

Zadie Smith on the Culinary Arts Part 1 of 2

Zadie Smith on the Culinary Arts Part 1 of 2

Political Culture and Culinary Traditions

Political Culture and Culinary Traditions