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Holy Week Culinary Traditions From New Mexico Part 1

Holy Week Culinary Traditions From New Mexico Part 1

 Adobe oven for Breaking Bread, Chamisal, New Mexico, 1940, Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Adobe oven for Breaking Bread, Chamisal, New Mexico, 1940, Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Research on the culinary traditions of Lent have resulted in a good number of sources from the late nineteenth century to the 1940s. Most come from historic newspapers, images, and WPA sources housed in the archives of the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. They serve as the basis for our series on food and the Lenten season. We share our findings in a paraphrased format when necessary to make them legible and we share illustrative direct quotes as often as possible. In Great Depression era New Mexico holy week is a time for visiting, talking, and eating. People baked bread in outdoor ovens called adobe hornos most often located on patios at the rear of their homes. Coals kept red-hot produces batches of rolls. These are eaten during a noon meal shared with family and friends.

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Holy Week Culinary Traditions From New Mexico Part 2

Holy Week Culinary Traditions From New Mexico Part 2

Carling Sunday

Carling Sunday