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Eating Plantains in Culinary Context

Eating Plantains in Culinary Context

Fruit vendor selling plantains and nineteenth Brazil

Fruit vendor selling plantains and nineteenth Brazil

This scene of a woman selling plantains could be in nineteenth century West or Central Africa, Brazil or Columbia. Plantains are indigenous to India; Asian traders introduced them to Africa during the Christian era, and Africans introduced them to the Americas during the Atlantic slave trade. African gradually made green and ripe yellow plantains a staple making breads, fritters, drinks, sliced deep fried treats, and fufu out of them. In tropical regions of the Americas, plantains became one of the first foods planted in subsistence gardens, distributed as rations, and sold as both produce and street foods.

Arepitas (fritters) Recipe

Ingredients

1 cup mashed ripe plantain

2 eggs

1 cup milk

¼ teaspoon salt

1 cup flour

1 tablespoon Crisco

1 tablespoon sugar

1 teaspoon baking powder

¼ teaspoon powdered cinnamon

Instructions

Boil the plantain. Separate the eggs. TO the yolks add the salt, baking powder and Crisco, beat well. Add the milk, beat again. Then add the plantain, the flour and cinnamon, last of all the beaten whites of the eggs. Fry on a griddle turning once. Serve hot with honey, syrup or guava jelly.

 

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