Welcome to Dr. Frederick Douglass Opie's personal website

AB, 101 Fast Food Head Shot.2jpg.jpg
Food, Jazz, and Protest in Jim Crow Washington, D.C, 1940s-1960s

Food, Jazz, and Protest in Jim Crow Washington, D.C, 1940s-1960s

“Food, Jazz, and Protest in Jim Crow Washington, D.C,” a podcast from author Fred Opie’s book Southern Food and Civil Rights: Feeding the Revolution. In an abstract of the related chapter to the podcast, Opie writes, in the 1940s through the early 1960s, Washington, D.C. had predominantly Jim Crow restaurants and cafeterias that catered to a “whites only” customer base. Historically, U.S. officials created the nation's capital out of the southern territories of Virginia and Maryland, and a small but powerful block of Dixiecrats ensured that Jim Crow keep eateries in the city segregated. Those who lived and worked in D.C. also had to endure the “battle of the plate,” referring to the long lines outside of restaurants with high customer demand but inferior food and service. At the same time, in Northwest D.C. one could find good food at black-owned restaurants in the old U Street Northwest corridor now called the Shaw neighborhood. During the first half of the 20th century, it became a jazz haven for Washingtonians with various clubs that propelled local music careers and hosted legendary jazz artists. 

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

Fred Opie Show Podcast

Fred Opie's New Book! Southern Food and Civil Rights: Feeding the Revolution

WPA Iowa Gardening Recipes and Notes Part 1

WPA Iowa Gardening Recipes and Notes Part 1

Afro Pacific Foodways Part 4

Afro Pacific Foodways Part 4